Fox Faq

 

General

 

How long will it take for my print order to ship?

I ship prints from my studio within 2-3 business days. Check out my shipping and exchange section for more information.

The print I want is no longer in stock or no longer on the site?

To retain an air of exclusivity, I cap all print products at 15 units. Depending on the demand/uproar, I may restock certain prints. However, once a print is removed from my shop section, it is no longer available for sale. 

Do you offer prints larger than 13" x 19" in size?

I print all my portraits + illustrations in-house to ensure high quality. The largest size via my studio is 13" x 19". However, custom sizing options can be arranged and would require an email to lauren.o.ulieme@gmail.com for further discussion in regards to pricing.

 

Commissions

 

What are commissions and how do I request one?

As a freelance illustrator, I draw and paint things for people. Commissions are paid for private or commercial-usage paintings and illustrations. To request custom work, visit my commissions section. You will find a questionnaire as well as the types of services I currently offer.  

What are your rates?

Rates in any creative profession are dependent on the description of the project, the size, the client, the turnaround time, and the usage (where and how widely the image or images will be used and seen). Because no two portraiture/illustration projects are the same – get in touch with as specific of a request as you can (see client questionnaire) and I'll offer you a personalized quote.

What are your turnaround times?

Typically 2-3 weeks serves as adequate time for completion of a detailed portrait or illustration and is commonly where most commission jobs fall. However, depending on the client's needs, a turnaround time can range anywhere from 24 hours to several months. 

 

Art-Related

 

Where do you live?

Currently, Kingsland,GA.

How long have you been drawing & when did you decide to become an illustrator?

11 years as of 2018. I decided to become an illustrator near the end of Freshman year in college. I attended the Savannah College of Art & Design originally for Architecture. Drafting was fun but my passion was not there. Learned what freelancing illustration was and the rest was history. 

How do you make your portraits and illustrations?

I draw and paint each project freehand digitally using a Wacom Mobile Studio Pro 16 tablet and Adobe Photoshop CC. 

What is digital painting?

Digital painting, in my opinion, is a cost-effective alternative to using traditional mediums like graphite, charcoal, color pencils, oils and acrylics (which I was initially trained in for 9.5 years). I draw with a pencil brush and lay down paint strokes by hand very similar to traditional techniques. The Wacom pen picks up the pressure and angle of my movements and the software is sophisticated enough to blend colors like real paint and build texture through layers of laying down brushstrokes, light and shadow, color, and detail. Despite the fact that I am working in pixels, I am still able to build up a piece and move "paint" around just like with traditional pigment.

What is your step-by-step process?

To break it down as simple as possible, I do research (as well as client consulting for commissions), loosely sketch a few different ideas to capture the general likeness (for portraits), concept and composition, paint in a base layer of light and shadow to capture the form, and then spend several hours building up color, details, and textures (refining and revising as necessary). 

What equipment would you recommend?

Quick disclaimer: I am an advocate of researching thoroughly before purchasing anything and weigh my options based on my own, personal needs. So while I would highly recommend Wacom products (specifically a Wacom Mobile Studio Pro or a Wacom Cintiq + Mac or a custom built tower) and Adobe Photoshop based on my personal experience, do not take my recommendations as law. You know your needs (and your budget) better than anyone else. Take the time to do your research. Art supplies of any kind are an investment. Treat those purchases with great care.